WELCOME TO OUR ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE PAGE

English as a Second Language, or ESL students, of all levels are welcome at IAS. When joining IAS, their journey begins with an interview and assessment by the ESL Program Coordinator. Those results are used to place each student in a group amongst peers of similar proficiency level. Group proficiency ranges from the CEFR levels A1-B2. Once students are welcomed into the ESL Program, they spend the year focusing completely on strengthening their academic English proficiency in four core areas: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking. Additionally the program includes lessons on English speaking culture and explicit grammar and vocabulary instruction. A teacher cohort of skilled professionals spends 5-6 lessons a week with each group. Generally, these groups are no larger than 8 students. Small group instruction makes it possible for students to get individualized attention and progress quicker. The small group setting allows all students to have their voices heard. ESL instructors are also advocates for ELLs and often collaborate with subject teachers, providing them with tools and advising them on how best to support the ELLs in their class. Students in the ESL program have the designation of Level 1 and are therefore eligible for differentiated instruction in subject classes.

 

ESL IN FOCUS

One of the greatest strengths of an international school is the way it embraces and celebrates diversity. You may wonder, however, whether such diversity can be accounted for in the curriculum. Will individual student’s strengths and weaknesses be recognized in the classroom? Will the school be able to adapt to varying levels of English? What about support for students with specialized needs like dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, ADHD, ASD, and anxiety? IAS firmly believes all students should have the same opportunity for success regardless of their personal learning profiles, which is why our school promotes differentiated instruction. The function of differentiated instruction is simple: to adapt the learning process to the needs of different students. It should be noted that the content for subject courses does not change. Students will still have the same academic goals, but some will simply get there using different approaches and with differing levels of assistance.

 

So what are some applications of differentiated instruction?

 

  • USING DIVERSE VISUAL, AUDIO, TEXT, AND KINESTHETIC TECHNIQUES IN THE CLASSROOM TO BOTH PRESENT IDEAS TO THE CLASS AS WELL AS ALLOW STUDENTS TO DEMONSTRATE THEIR KNOWLEDGE

 

  • PROVIDING STUDENTS WITH AT-LEVEL VOCABULARY AND CONCEPT LISTS, IDEALLY INCLUDING CLEAR ILLUSTRATION

 

  • ENCOURAGING GROUP AND PAIR WORK WHERE STUDENTS HAVE SKILLS THAT COMPLEMENT EACH OTHER

 

  • SMALL FOCUS GROUPS TO HELP STUDENTS WHO REQUIRE ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE IN A GIVEN SKILL

Official newspaper of the International American School

The IAS Times is the official student newspaper of the International American School of Warsaw.

See the magazine